The People Involved in Freeze HD Warm My Heart

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by Carlos Briceño |

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On Saturday evening, my wife, Jill, and I will be putting on our fancy party clothes to attend the 7th Annual Freeze HD virtual event. The benefit will feature celebrities, music performances, and a silent auction, with the goal of raising money for the Huntington’s Disease Society of America.

In the past few years, Jill and I have mostly only traveled to see family. We haven’t really attended any Huntington’s conventions or fundraisers, so we are excited that this year’s virtual event gives us the opportunity to do so.

We don’t like going to these events in person, because we both have sensory issues and can only handle being around people and noise for short periods of time. One day, traveling to these events will be impossible for Jill because of her Huntington’s disease (HD).

Although I wish the COVID-19 pandemic had never happened, one benefit is that virtual events have become more common. And to make this year’s Freeze HD even more accessible, the event is free.

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The fabulous lineup of entertainers will feature hosts Kate Miner, Scott Porter, and Jason Ritter. Out of curiosity, I researched how each has been affected by Huntington’s disease.

Actress and musician Kate Miner found out several years ago that Huntington’s runs in her family. Her mother and two sisters tested gene-positive, while she did not.

In 2013, actor Scott Porter found out that his new bride’s mother had tested positive for HD. His wife, Kelsey Mayfield, then tested gene-positive.

Actor Jason Ritter witnessed a former girlfriend’s father battle HD, and he experienced firsthand the devastation it caused her family.

As I read about the hosts’ intersections with HD, I was touched by the fact that they each are fighting the disease by building awareness, raising money, and telling others not to give up.

HD is a ferocious opponent, which is why it’s important for people to step up and use their talents, imagination, networks, faith, hope, love, and courage to fight it.

My family and I are thankful for all those involved in Freeze HD. These people, and the events they host, give the HD community hope for a cure and help us feel less alone.

Jill and I hope to “see” you there on Oct. 16. It may be virtual, but don’t forget to wear your fancy party clothes!

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Note: Huntington’s Disease News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Huntington’s Disease News or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to Huntington’s disease.

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