Margarida Maia, PhD, science writer —

Margarida is a biochemist (University of Porto, Portugal) with a PhD in biomedical sciences (VIB and KULeuven, Belgium). Her main interest is science communication. She is also passionate about design and the dialogue between art and science.

Articles by Margarida Maia

Antipsychotic cariprazine may ease Huntington’s motor symptoms

Cariprazine, an oral medication approved for schizophrenia, may ease some motor symptoms people with Huntington’s disease experience across different stages of the condition, a small study suggests. How cariprazine works in Huntington’s still isn’t clear, but researchers think it may balance out dopamine levels when they’re too high, as…

Calcium channel blockers may speed Huntington’s in those at risk

Huntington’s disease could develop at earlier ages in people using calcium channel blockers to control hypertension, a study that looked into genes encoding targets of blood pressure-lowering medications reported. Findings may have important implications for managing high blood pressure in people at risk of Huntington’s, identified before disease…

Computer-based test shows promise in tracking cognitive decline

A computer-based test called SelfCog, which tests various cognitive functions in a standardized manner, yielded promising results in assessing cognitive decline in people with early-stage Huntington’s disease, a study has found. SelfCog demonstrated sensitivity to detect cognitive decline over a one-year follow-up, outperforming traditional cognitive assessments, and showed associations…

Huntington’s researcher wins 2023 Arvid Carlsson Award

Sarah Tabrizi, MD, PhD, a researcher at the University College London (UCL) in the U.K., is the winner of this year’s Lund University Arvid Carlsson Award for her work in understanding Huntington’s disease and developing treatments to slow or stop its progression. The prize is given to researchers who…

Subtle speech changes may be first symptoms of Huntington’s: Study

Subtle changes in speech are present before obvious symptoms of Huntington’s disease appear, and could potentially be a quantitative biomarker for the neurodegenerative disorder, a small study found. The changes in speaking identified among Huntington’s patients were linked to age and an individual’s number of disease-causing CAG repeats —…