Carlos Briceño,  —

Carlos is a journalist and director of communications who, through the grace of God, has been blessed with a brilliant, beautiful, and courageous wife and daughter. His wife found out she was gene-positive for Huntington’s Disease (HD) at the age of 41, while his daughter found out she was gene-positive for HD when she was 22. Carlos’s aim in writing column is to offer a caregiver’s perspective while also trying to inspire those families who are dealing with Huntington’s. He loves to evangelize, read, play soccer, and share — according to family members —really bad puns. (For the record, Carlos thinks his puns are really punny and funderful.)

Articles by Carlos Briceño

Do You Listen or Wait Your Turn to Talk?

While talking about family illnesses with friends recently, I sat back and watched people discussing cancer, dementia, and myriad other life-altering conditions. Everyone had a story to tell about taking care of someone with an illness or experiencing it themselves. I noticed that, after each person shared, the group moved…

My Daughter’s Diagnosis Won’t Defeat Her

Here’s the scene: My wife, Jill, and I are at Jill’s work. We’re on speakerphone with our daughter’s friend, who is at a hospital almost 1,000 miles away with three other friends and Lou, our daughter. (Lou is our daughter’s nickname.) The reason for the call is to listen in…

The Monsters Under the Bed

“The Talk” has a very different meaning to most people than it does in our home. When our daughter was born, my wife, Jill, had a very clear wish that we would always be open and honest with our daughter about things. By “things,” Jill meant most everything. She wanted…

Our Family’s Bad Dream Won’t Go Away

Family traditions often include fond memories. For instance, President John F. Kennedy’s family tradition involved sailing a 25-foot sailboat called the Victura. The open sea, the wind at your back, the blue skies, the sun sparkling off the water — who wouldn’t look back at those memories and not smile…

Wondering and Worrying: The Months Before Diagnosis

I imagine some of you know people who are experts at worrying. Pick any situation and these worrywarts will rev up with a highlight reel of catastrophic scenarios usually involving pain, blood, and a depressing outcome. For the record, I’m the opposite of that kind of person. I fall into…